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Nutrition

Many of today's generation of musclemen are told by nutritionists and bodybuilding experts that well-balanced meals will offer enough protein for all but the most intense exercisers.
Is your new baby getting enough iron? It’s important to know. The mineral provides fuel for growth spurts, brain development and more. Find out the exact amount your new baby needs and good food sources of iron.
Firms are advertising herbs and supplements as remedies for everything from colds and asthma to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, but dietary supplements and herbal mixtures aimed at children may be a waste of money -- and a threat to their health.
Many of us used the old Food Pyramid for years to help make sure we were following a balanced diet. Its replacement, Choose My Plate, was introduced in 2011.
Detailed information on diagnosing and evaluating heart disease in children
Trust that when kids are hungry enough, they'll eat the healthy options you serve.
How do you know your infant or toddler is getting what he needs in the food department?
Eating healthy is an important part of a healthy lifestyle and is something that should be taught to children at a young age.
Although a lot of young children are finicky about food, they need help when they won’t eat the amount or variety required to keep up their nutritional status.
Getting our daily dose of fiber is something we as adults think about as we get older. But fiber is as important for children, too. Often, children don't get enough.
Here are suggestions to help you help your children attain and maintain a healthy weight.
Your children can help you make this easy dessert that's colorful and good for them to eat. Have all of your supplies and ingredients ready before you begin.
The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases offers suggestions to help your child develop and maintain good eating habits and to prevent chaotic mealtimes in your home.
Here are recipes that fit the bill for teaching some baking basics and setting some good nutrition patterns early. All you'll need are some simple tools and tolerance for a few spills. These recipes are safe for a child to make (with adult help) and are practically foolproof.
Learning a bit more about vitamins and minerals can help ensure your kids are on the right nutritional track.
The earlier you teach children such sound habits, the more likely they are to maintain a healthy weight.
It's not always easy to get your children to eat enough fruits and vegetables.
Nutrition experts agree that a wide assortment of nutritionally balanced snacks served in moderation can be a healthy, essential part of a child's diet.
You may think of heart disease as a problem for adults, not your young children. But diet and exercise habits started in childhood can begin a lifetime of heart health, or a lifetime of heart damage.
Some kids don't want to try new things in their lunch. But a variety of foods gives children a variety of nutrients and expands their palates.
At every stage of life, healthful eating fuels health and fitness.
If you're not eating right, you may be at risk for problems with your teeth and mouth. Bad eating habits can cause tooth decay and gum disease.
Now is the time to share your tried-and-true recipes and kitchen sense with those who will appreciate them the most: your grandchildren.
Kids who drink soda tend to eat fewer fruits and vegetables, and get less calcium, protein and vitamins A and D, because they are drinking less milk. They also take in more calories.
At the beginning of your baby’s life, milk was the only thing she needed to grow. Now she’s grown by leaps and bounds and even has teeth! You may be wondering how to introduce her to solid foods. Here’s a guide to how and when to introduce her to new foods.
Walking the aisles, you can talk about making wholesome food choices, show how ads drive purchases, and expose your child to new fruits and vegetables.
Fruit juice contains a lot of natural sugar, so drinking too much can cause obesity, stunted growth, digestive problems and tooth decay.
Most nutrition experts and dietitians say that children of any age -- even infants -- can safely follow a vegetarian diet, according to the Nemours Foundation. But some planning is involved to ensure that children receive the proper nutrients, especially if their diet does not include eggs and dairy products.
If your teen wants vegetarian options, you may worry that dropping meat, poultry and fish will be unhealthy.
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