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Safety

For safety's sake, look through your home often. Keep an eye out for not-so-obvious hazards.
Safe Kids Worldwide estimates that three out of four children too small for seatbelts are incorrectly restrained in car seats or booster seats.
You don't want to spend this winter battling a runny nose, a nagging cough or a fever. Here's what to do.
Polycarbonate plastic is durable, impact-resistant, and clear. It is widely used in food and beverage containers, but research has raised concerns over its health effects.
Coaches should tell players not to tackle or block with their heads or run head-down with the ball.
Your little ones can learn a lot about safety if you take some time to teach them. Here's an ABC that you and your children can recite together.
You can help keep your children safe by following these precautions.
Parents of kids with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) face a tough choice: whether to medicate their children or not.
A car with an air bag is considered safer than a car without one. But for children under 12 years old, air bags can be dangerous.
Installing your child's car seat properly and using it every time your son or daughter rides in the car is one of the best ways to help keep him or her safe in case of an accident.
Experts say players can avoid injury by strengthening muscles through a supervised weight-training program before the season. That helps prevent injuries to knees and ankles, the most common court injuries.
Contacts that aren't properly prescribed and cared for can lead to allergic reactions, bacterial infections, corneal ulcers, and corneal scrapes. Some problems can end in blindness.
Whether on an adult or a child, a helmet that has been approved by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and fits correctly will cushion the head in a fall and protect it from impact with other objects.
Toy-related injuries send tens of thousands of children to the emergency room each year. Most injuries occur when parents give their children toys meant for older children.
Detailed information on car safety
A safe cheerleading program will include direct adult supervision, proper conditioning, skills training and warm-up exercises.
Although concussions range from mild to severe, they're all serious injuries that can harm the way the brain works.
If you wear contact lenses, it's important to follow your eye care provider's instructions on wearing and disinfecting them.
A common ingredient in many cough and cold remedies has become a popular substance to abuse by teenagers searching for a cheap, easy high.
Just about everybody loves a party. But if your party menu includes alcohol, be a smart host and insist that your guests to play it safe on the way home.
No matter how good a driver you are, high speeds or impaired or careless driving by others can place you in danger.
It's best to let the professionals handle the fireworks displays. If you plan to celebrate the holiday with your own fireworks, these precautions can help prevent injuries.
The sports that cause the most injuries are basketball, baseball, pool sports and racket sports. But any sport that involves a projectile is considered hazardous to the eyes.
Teen girls who are athletes face unique obstacles when it comes to their bodies and how well they perform.
Halloween safety begins at home, with the child's costume. Every part of the costume -- masks, beards, wigs and clothing -- should be made of flame-resistant material.
Here are tips on the basics of child safety.
Although people know toys can be dangerous, injuries can still occur.
As part of your preparation for your new baby, you probably got an infant safety seat for the car. But do you know how to make sure it’s installed properly? And when do you switch to a child safety seat? Learn the ins and outs of safe car travel for your little one.
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