What is Hemophilia?

Hemophilia happens when the body does not make enough clotting factor. The severity or risk of bleeding depends on the level of clotting factor that is present.

There are two kinds of hemophilia:

  • Hemophilia A is Factor 8 deficiency
  • Hemophilia B is Factor 9 deficiency

Hemophilia is an inherited condition. The hemophilia gene is carried by women on one of their X chromosomes. It can be passed to their baby boys.

Severe cases happen when the factor level is less than 1 percent in children with hemophilia A or hemophilia B. These children:

  • Are at risk for bleeding after dental work, surgery, and trauma
  • May have internal or joint bleeding with no trauma, injury or apparent cause

Repeated joint bleeds can lead to other health problems and disabilities, such as:

  • Chronic hemophilia arthropathy (joint disease)
  • Loss of range of motion

Moderate hemophilia is when children have 1 percent to 5 percent of Factor 8 or Factor 9 in their body. These children:

  • Are at risk for bleeding after surgery, dental procedures and trauma
  • May have occasional joint problems
  • Rarely experience spontaneous life-threatening bleeds

Mild hemophilia occurs when children have more than 5 percent of Factor 8 or Factor 9 in their body. These children:

  • May go undiagnosed until bleeding occurs after trauma or surgery